29 Oct 2014

October 29, 2014


    Sunrise was at 07:53 Hours Monday morning, October 27, 2014.


    Snow line was looking good on Monday morning.



    Weather moved in by days end on Monday. No real precipitation until after midnight.


   A few breaks in the afternoon, but a fairly wet day Tuesday. 18 mm recorded at 660 meters on Tues.


   This picture pretty much tells the story. +6 at 660 meters and 0 at 2240 Meters 17:00 Hrs Tuesday.



Weather Observations for October 29, 2014; taken at 06:00 Hours.

2240 meters        -1, Winds were 10-20 KPH from the SSW
1860 meters       +1, Winds were 15-30 KPH from the SSE
1550 meters       +3, Relative Humidity was 98 %
  660 meters       +6, Valley Temperature, Max Temp Yest was +6.9, 18.2 mm of rain recorded



For the forecast, the moist warm air mass will slowly exit the area this afternoon as a weak high pressure system aloft brings unsettled conditions by this evening into Thursday morning. We can expect light - moderate rain for most of Thursday morning.  Freezing levels will hover around the 2000 meter level.  The next frontal wave brings moderate-heavy precipitation to the area by Thursday evening, with similar freezing levels. This system should disperse by Friday afternoon ushering in a cool upper trough with unsettled conditions, trending to dry conditions for Saturday.  Freezing levels could go as low as 1000 meters. Long term models at this time have little confidence so will elaborate on the forecast for next week on Friday. The trend on the weekend does appear to be cooler with freezing levels down to 1300 meters (Sunday) in an unsettled pattern. Another Pacific front may be on the way for early next week.




    Satellite picture from yesterday afternoon, October 28, 2014.


    This image taken at the same time as the one above. Need some cooler temps to get the guns on!!



    System that is moving on shore today.


    Model for later this afternoon. Drier conditions this evening.


Articles:

Big Mountain Skiing: Surviving in Avalanche Country

Snow Guardians - A documentary about Ski Patrolling: Kim Kircher Blog

Wilderness First Aid Kit 101: The Essentials

Remnants of tropical storm 'Ana' affects BC: The Watchers

Uncertainty & Risk, Managing theory with practical adaptation in avalanche hazard: Steve Conger




    Snow line still at a respectable level considering the temperatures.



Hi Wayne,
Went for an exploratory trip up Sproat last Friday. Snow levels were considerably less than expected, Snow Depth on the back of Gin Peak at around 1700m was less than 30cm.  We were able to drive the whole way up the access road that the snowmobile company use, and there was no sign of any snow where we parked at around 1450m.  Not enough to ski on, but we did find this awesome pond skim!

Dan

                                                                                                                                    Dan Cudlip Photo

                                                                                                   Dan Cudlip Photo

Hi Wayne, 
I've read your blog for a while, it's great and I hope you keep things going this winter!

I was up in the Duffy this weekend, got some fresh turns in. There was about 40cm of somewhat consolidated base on Saturday, with rain up to 1800m. We slept at 2000m, and got about 10-15 cm overnight. Temperatures were -6 in the morning with a light breeze, and the base was somewhat more consolidated with the cooler temps. Got some fresh turns, and only hit one rock (rock skis recommended)! We saw a small (sz 1ish) on a south facing slope off in the distance later in the morning.

The alpine could use a good dump of snow, but if you can find the right lines, it's game on.

Cheers, Mauro

                                                                                                                             Mauro Perizzalo Photo
                                                                                                                            Mauro Perizzalo Photo

   To Read the paper click here: WSL Institute for Snow & Avalanche Research

No comments:

Post a comment